Monthly Archives: May 2018

May Historical Events: Civil War

1856 Massachusetts Senator Charles Sumner, an outspoken abolitionist, gave an oration attacking not only the institution of slavery, but two Senators personally, Stephen Douglas of Illinois and Andrew Butler of South Carolina for supporting it in his “Crime Against Kansas” speech. Three days later, South Carolina Rep. Preston Brooks, Butler’s cousin, entered the chamber and severely beat Sumner with a cane.  The bleeding and unconscious Sumner had to be carried from the floor, while Brooks walked away unscathed.  The “Caning” incident made Sumner a martyr in the North, while many Southerners proclaimed Brooks a champion for defending the honor of his relative. 1863 On 2 May in the Battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, General Stonewall Jackson executed a brilliant flanking attack on the Union right.  In a surprise attack, his Confederates smashed into and routed the Union XI Corps under General Oliver O. Howard.  That night, while leading a group of officers on a night reconnaissance ride, Jackson was mistakenly wounded by friendly fire. A Mortal Blow to the Confederacy: The Fall of New Orleans, 1862 I am excited to announce that my new book, A Mortal Blow to the Confederacy: The Fall of New Orleans, 1862, has just been released!…

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Civil War Medicine

An excerpt from the medical report after Antietam: Gross misrepresentations of the conduct of medical officers have been made and scattered broadcast over the country, causing deep and heart-rending anxiety to those who had friends or relatives in the army, who might at any moment require the services of a surgeon. It is not to be supposed that there were no incompetent surgeons in the army. It is certainly true that there were; but these sweeping denunciations against a class of men who will favorably compare with the military surgeons of any country, because of the incompetency and short-comings of a few, are wrong, and do injustice to a body of men who have labored faithfully and well. It is easy to magnify an existing evil until it is beyond the bounds of truth. It is equally easy to pass by the good that has been done on the other side. Some medical officers lost their lives in their devotion to duty in the battle of Antietam, and others sickened from excessive labor which they conscientiously and skillfully performed. Dr. Jonathan Letterman, Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac Share This: FacebookTwitterLinkedinemail

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